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Did you know that Nationwide Boiler's CataStak SCR system can reduce NOx emissions by as much as 99%? Recent source test results from a rental customer in the Central Valley of California prove just that!

Nationwide Boiler is currently renting a 70,000 lb/hr trailer-mounted package watertube boiler and CataStak SCR system to a tomato processing facility with strict emission limits of 5 ppm NOx. The source test was performed under normal season loads, in several 30 minute runs, and tested for NOx, CO and ammonia slip. Results show that the system emitted only 0.7 ppm NOx with 0.39 ppm ammonia slip! In addition to superior the superior NOx control that our system provides, low ammonia slip illustrates the effectiveness of our design related to the mixing of ammonia and NOx prior to the catalyst.

We are proud that our system can produce such extraordinary results and reduce our customer's emissions to meet the stringent and ever-changing air requirements. For more information, read our latest press release!

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We proudly promote the Nationwide Boiler CataStak™ Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) System for single-digit NOx emissions on package boilers and other fired equipment. Have you ever wondered exactly what NOx is, and, why reducing NOx emissions and your carbon footprint is important?  

NOx refers to nitrogen oxides. It is a generic term for a group of highly reactive gases containing oxygen and nitrogen in varying amounts. NOx forms when fuel is burned at high temperatures, like in a burner combustion process. Package boilers, fired heaters, gas turbines, heat recovery steam generators, and other fired equipment will produce varying levels of NOx, depending on the type of fuel, the burner construction and arrangement, and if any SCR technology is being used.

In short, reducing NOx emissions into the atmosphere will reduce a number of health and environmental hazards linked to the harmful pollutant. NOx has been linked to ground-level ozone, acid rain, water quality deterioration, global warming, and a number of significant respiratory issues.

The EPA and state air boards have been instrumental in the reduction of stack emissions since the 70’s, and Nationwide Boiler has been using and selling CataStak™ SCR systems to continue the trend. Check out this informative article for more detailed information on the harmful effects of NOx and how the EPA is working to control it.

https://goo.gl/61L9JG

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Nationwide Boiler is proud to announce that we have achieved an Experience Modification Rate (EMR) of 0.61, the lowest rate possible for our company! A low EMR exhibits our commitment to safe work practices and continuous on the job training. 

An Experience Modification Rate is a numeric representation of a company’s safety record, used by the insurance company for workers’ compensation policies.  The industry average EMR is 1.0, and we are well below the average!

Nationwide Boiler’s Health, Safety & Environmental Manager, Holly Lepo, leads the company’s safety program, which includes over 60 individual safety modules ranging from abrasive wheel grinding to workplace violence. Since 2005, Holly has been developing, implementing, training, and fine tuning the program with the help of ISNETworld and Avetta contractor qualification networks. 

We would like to thank Holly and the employees of Nationwide Boiler for your hard work and dedication to safety, allowing us to achieve this excellent EMR rate.

View our latest press release for more information. 

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Years ago, it was not uncommon to read news about tragic boiler explosions, sometimes resulting in mass destruction. Today, boilers are equipped with important safety devises to help protect against these types of catastrophes. Let’s take a look at the most critical of these devices: the safety valve. 

What:

The safety valve is one of the most important safety devices in a steam system. Safety valves provide a measure of security for plant operators and equipment from over pressure conditions.

The main function of a safety valve is to relieve pressure. It is located on the boiler steam drum, and will automatically open when the pressure of the inlet side of the valve increases past the preset pressure. 

All boilers are required by ASME code to have at least one safety valve, dependent upon the maximum flow capacity (MFC) of the boiler. The total capacity of the safety valve at the set point must exceed the steam control valve’s MFC if the steam valve were to fail to open. In most cases, two safety valves per boiler are required, and a third may be needed if they do not exceed the MFC. 

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How:

There are three main parts to the safety valve: nozzle, disc, and spring. Pressurized steam enters the valve through the nozzle and is then threaded to the boiler. The disc is the lid to the nozzle, which opens or closes depending on the pressure coming from the boiler. The spring is the pressure controller.

As a boiler starts to over pressure, the nozzle will start to receive a higher pressure coming from the inlet side of the valve, and will start to sound like it is simmering. When the pressure becomes higher than the predetermined pressure of the spring, the disc will start to lift and release the steam, creating a “pop” sound. After it has released and the steam and pressure drops below the set pressure of the valve, the spring will close the disc. Once the safety valve has popped, it is important to check the valve to make sure it is not damaged and is working properly.

Why:

A safety valve is usually referred to as the last line of safety defense. Without safety valves, the boiler can exceed it’s maximum allowable working pressure (MAWP) and not only damage equipment, but also injure or kill plant operators that are close by. Many variables can cause a safety valve on a boiler to lift, such as a compressed air or electrical power failure to control instrumentation, or an imbalance of feedwater rate caused by an inadvertently shut or open isolation valve. 

Once a safety valve has lifted, it is important to do a complete boiler inspection and confirm that there are no other boiler servicing issues. A safety valve should only do its job once; safety valves should not lift continuously.

Lastly, it is important to have the safety valves fully repaired, cleaned and recertified with a National Board valve repair (VR) stamp as required by local code or jurisdiction. Safety valves are a critical component in a steam system, and must be maintained. 

All of Nationwide Boiler’s rental boilers include on to two safety valves depending on the size; one set at design pressure and the other set slightly higher than design. By request, we can reset the safeties to a lower pressure if the application requires it. In addition, the valves are thoroughly checked after every rental and before going out to a new customer, and they are replaced and re-certified as needed. 

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